Not Your Problem

I skipped my post last Saturday because I was tired, and I was angry and worried about something entirely out of my control, and I didn’t want the vitriol from that to spill out into my blog writing. Particularly since Saturdays are when I try to stick to topics related to building a writing platform, which is a topic I find stressful enough as it is. Natural web guru/marketer I am not. I believe it’s something I can learn to be proficient in, but thus far it’s not something I enjoy working on, so I decided to simply do my usual writing and not push it with the stress.

(Sometimes taking a break is essential. I hate taking breaks.) Continue reading “Not Your Problem”

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Stubborn Novel

I like outlines, but I also like discovering my plots and characters as I go, so I fall somewhere in the middle of the plotter/pantser argument. I outline about half of my stories, sketch out my main character(s) and a handful of side characters, and then let the ending and final conflict put themselves together in the end. This works because usually by the time I reach the three-quarter mark, I’ve got a really good idea of how the rest of the book will go. My present project is no cooperating with this model at all. Continue reading “Stubborn Novel”

This is Why We Organize Our Thoughts First

This is going to be a short post, because it’s more of a PSA, and it goes like this: if you write down a file of ideas for blog posts so they’ll be saved up for days when you don’t have so much creative thought about a particular topic, don’t lose the file. Seriously. (Guess what I just spent two hours doing?) Continue reading “This is Why We Organize Our Thoughts First”

Poggy Strankfelder

All First Sorceress Glenna Stormraven wants is to be left alone, with no whiny princesses to deal with. Just when she thinks she’s found a home that’s out of the way, an enterprising gnomish realtor starts selling the neighboring property. It’s up to her to handle the situation, deal with more fussy clients, and with her less-than-desirable neighbors. Meanwhile, Poggy Strankfelder finds out that selling land owned by demons has consequences that come in the form of pickle-salesman-turned-assassin Jiurt. Continue reading “Poggy Strankfelder”

Audience is What Now?

I’ve been reading through The Writer’s Workout, by Christina Katz, and lately a lot of the advice that’s come up has to do with writing to your audience and understanding your audience and directing marketing to your audience. It all starts with defining your audience, though. So I started wondering about mine. (I’ve figured out it’s probably not cute little finches, but other than that still kind of vague with the details.) Continue reading “Audience is What Now?”

What Star Trek Beyond Taught Me About Raising Stakes

For anyone who doesn’t know, I love science fiction and fantasy, mostly because when I was little my family watched Star Trek. I’m not quite a Trekkie, I’m not an obsessive fan, and I can’t even say it’s my favorite, but it holds a special place in my heart, and I’ll always come back to it. Star Trek on the whole is unusual for science fiction because it holds at its heart a positivity that’s rare. In these stories, humanity isn’t just vicious colonialists or desperate survivors or gruff anti-heroes acting in contrast to a bloated evil empire. Instead, we humans explore, and create, and do our best to make the right choice and protect people. It’s hopeful. Continue reading “What Star Trek Beyond Taught Me About Raising Stakes”

When to Start a Platform

When am I supposed to start my writing platform? After I’m established? Right before my first book comes out? Before I even finish a first draft? While starting a platform without even having a start to a book seems a little premature (especially for fiction), the rest of it tends to vary just as much as the rest of the “rules” of writing. Continue reading “When to Start a Platform”